Replicating (and reconsidering) Aquinas

Benozzo Gozzoli 004aThere remains lots to catch up on related to work of Junius Institute members, but a few recent items related to Thomas Aquinas are worthy of particular note:

1) JI research curator David Sytsma has an article in Reformation & Renaissance Review, “Vermigli Replicating Aquinas: An Overlooked Continuity in the Doctrine of Predestination.” From the abstract: “Vermigli not only drew upon Aquinas’s doctrine in general, as he does elsewhere, but reproduced the details of Aquinas’s article in the Summa on whether foreknowledge of merits is the cause of predestination.”

2) JI senior fellow Richard A. Muller has a three-part review essay of a recent study of Aquinas at Reformation21 (part 1, part 2, part 3). A comprehensive version will be forthcoming in Calvin Theological Journal.

3) The edited volume Aquinas among the Protestants, edited by Manfred Svensson and David VanDrunen is out, and includes contributions from me, “Deformation and Reformation: Thomas Aquinas and the Rise of Protestant Scholasticism,” as well as David Sytsma, “Thomas Aquinas and Reformed Biblical Interpretation: The Contribution of William Whitaker.”

CFP: Sources in Early Modern Economics, Ethics, and Law (Second Series)

OEJ logoAndrew M. McGinnis, a JI research fellow, serves as a general editor for the Sources in Early Modern Economics, Ethics, and Law (Second Series), the successor to a series I worked on. He has issued a call for proposals, and more information is available here.

The first volume of the second series, On the Law of Nature: A Demonstrative Method, is by Niels Hemmingsen and is due out later this month. E. J. Hutchinson of Hillsdale College is the translator and editor, and wrote an introduction with fellow Hillsdale professor Korey D. Maas.

Update: Todd M. Rester

rester_t_editedThe Junius Institute director Todd M. Rester has joined a research project based at the Queen’s University Belfast as a postdoctoral research fellow. The project, “War and the Supernatural in Early Modern Europe,” is a wide-ranging endeavor focused on “re-examining the relationship between faith and force in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.”

Dr. Rester is exploring “the nature of religious war among the Franciscans in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries as it was often expressed within the broader structure of a Just War theory as developed from the patristic and medieval teachings.” His responsibilities include translation as well as research directed toward the production of a monograph.

Also worth noting is the imminent release of the firstfruits of an extensive translation project that Dr. Rester has been involved in, the publication of an English-language edition of Petrus van Mastricht’s Theoretico-practica theologia (1698). The first volume, Theoretical and Practical Theology Volume 1: Intellectual Prerequisites, is slated for release soon.

Synopsis Purioris Theologiae Colloquium March 31-April 1

I also want to take an opportunity to give you more details about the special colloquium on Thursday, March 31-Friday April 1 on the Synopsis Purioris Theologiae as we have quite an array of scholars. You won’t want to miss that. Your support is helping to make this event possible. Also, if you do plan on coming to the Synopsis Purioris Colloquium, we do ask that you REGISTER ONLINE (for free) so that we can be certain we have enough seating and space for everyone. If you need to stay locally, we recommend the Prince Conference Center at Calvin College.

The Leiden Synopsis Purioris Theologiae (1625) and
Theological Disputation in the Era of Orthodoxy

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JI Spring Colloquium Schedule

This Spring we have an exciting array of scholars that are scheduled to speak in a variety of venues. We hope you will be able to join us either in person or online. Also, I wanted to take a moment to remind you and encourage you to consider a few things. Through our Colloquium series, since August 2015, we have had opportunity in person and online to present to about 2,500 attendees and viewers globally. That is simultaneously encouraging and daunting. It is tremendously encouraging because, as you may or may not know, the Junius Institute is fueled and funded overwhelmingly and primarily by the ardor, love, and zeal of its volunteers. These selfless volunteers have devoted their gifts, time, and effort to make this possible for the public good of a global audience of students, scholars, pastors, and the interested general public. It is daunting because as our reach has grown, our support has not kept pace. We are asking for your timely assistance. Please donate either by a one time gift or regularly. Your support builds people. Your support builds students, scholars, and pastors, globally. Your support makes the colloquium series into a rich conversation with scholars globally and helps academies, seminaries, and even churches. Your gift of whatever size helps us defray travel costs, meals, lodging, multimedia presentations, and so forth. It also reaches people. It keeps our projects and presentations free. That’s right, free to the public. So if you can give, please do, it helps scholars travel, eat, sleep, and speak. It helps students learn and scholars as well as pastors reflect. We also delight in providing a platform for students, new scholars, and established scholars to speak. I have the pleasure of receiving notes and e-mails from you–our viewers–from time to time thanking us for the content and the conversation. Your encouragement both in word and gift is necessary: it helps us keep going in so many ways.

Without any more adieu it is my pleasure to let you know about the colloquium schedule for the remainder of the Spring. The links below are to our presentations that have either already occurred or soon will.

I look forward to seeing you either here in Grand Rapids or online, and thank you for your support,

Todd Rester, Director

Junius Institute Colloquium
Spring 2016 Schedule

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